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Healthy Goals, Psychology, and Performance Assessment

A reader reported that the “Motivation: Intentions, Goals and Plans” chapter of my book, The Peaceful Warrior’s Path, triggered memories and painful feelings about performance reviews.

 

That set me to thinking that the cause of much of the trouble with performance assessment as a part of performance management was psychology and mindset about criticism, coupled with organizational and personal resistance to addressing those issues.

A recent Harvard Business Review article pointed out that

“Performance reviews are awkward. They’re biased. They stick us in boxes and leave us waiting far too long for feedback. It’s no surprise that by the end of 2015, at least 30 of the Fortune 500 companies had ditched performance evaluations altogether. But let’s not throw the baby out with the bathwater.”[1]

 

My reader, a financial professional with a decades long career, reexperienced anxiety about being found deficient, reinforcing her need for perfection and acceptance by others, highlighting weakness and imperfection. Embarrassment, financial, and career consequences, circled in her mind.

As a result, she was triggered by the thought of setting goals and objectives. In her experience they were often unrealistic and rigid.

Others report a sense that they are being evaluated without adequate objective criteria and by people who are biased and, in some cases, unqualified, unprepared, or uninterested. Often the goals and objectives, even those set by the individual performer, are rigid and not adjusted when conditions change.

 

The Benefits of Performance Reviews

But let’s not just jettison performance goals, objectives, and assessments. Let’s make the best of them, to use them for personal growth and organizational success.

The HBR authors reported that at Facebook “a survey of more than 300 people found that “87% of people wanted to keep performance ratings.”[2]

They realized the need for candid feedback to give employees a sense of where they stand in the eyes of their organization and what they need to improve, and to give the organization knowledge of employee performance to support training, compensation, and hiring decisions.

Add to that the benefits, clarity of purpose and direction, which come from establishing rational expectations in the form of goals and objectives.

 

What Gets in The Way?

But something gets in the way. Not every organization is as wise as Facebook about optimizing their performance assessment process, including setting, and adjusting goals.

When I look at the issue from a project management perspective, I see three predominant causes of unskillful performance assessment: lack of clear goals and objectives, psychological/mindset issues, and poor process.

In this article we home in on the psychological issues and how they impact and are impacted by the other causes.

 

Psychology, Mindset, and Performance

There has been resistance to addressing psychological issues in the workplace. But we do well to be aware of these issues because individual psychology influences behavior and behavior influences performance and relationships.

The interplay among individual psychological tendencies and mindsets, cultural and organizational norms, and self-awareness influences performance and makes for a complex system. In a complex system change anywhere can have an impact everywhere.

For example, a project team member may make decisions influenced by fear of upsetting the functional manager who will give her the next review. Another performer may avoid committing to goals and objectives to avoid imagined failure. A project team may be reluctant to commit to objectives they feel are unrealistic and that they will be evaluated against regardless of changes to any number of conditions

 

In our projects, we see that factors like

  • Individual anxiety and perfectionism,
  • cultural norms,
  • performance processes
  • attitudes regarding success and failure,
  • communication and relationship capabilities,
  • levels of emotional and social intelligence, and
  • organizational support levels evidenced by allocating sufficient time and attention and adjusting objectives as conditions change,

all contribute to the success or failure of performance assessments and performance management.

 

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Skillful Performance management

Awareness of and sensitivity to psychological and cultural tendencies enables skillful performance management.

In projects, performance reviews are not limited to individual performers. We assess performance on individual projects and the performance across multiple projects of individuals, project teams, departments, and organizations.

Performance management should be treated like a program with each assessment of a project. Intentions, goals, and values drive performance. When we evaluate the effectiveness of performance management these elements must be considered. If we never evaluate the effectiveness of the program, it is likely to be ineffective. And that leads to less-than-optimal performance overall.

 

The intention of performance management is to improve and optimize performance while creating a work environment in which performers at all levels of the organization’s hierarchy feel safe and have a sense that the process is fair and objective. Values: effectiveness, kindness, candor, self-reflection, emotional intelligence.

The goal is to enable clarity regarding performance effectiveness through a process of performance reviews which include the assessment of the factors beyond individual behaviors that contribute to achieving optimal performance.

Objectives are to regularly assess the performance of individuals, projects, teams, and organizations to identify opportunities for improvement based upon pre-established criteria and to make decisions regarding the need for training, deciding who will be compensated at what levels, who will and will not be retained, and what organizational, management, cultural, and environmental changes are needed to achieve optimal performance.

 

Optimal Performance

If the intention and goal is to achieve optimal performance, then we must know what optimal performance means. It means performing as best as possible given current conditions where performance is measured by the ability to achieve desired results – satisfied clients, profits, clean air, healthy and happy executives, managers, and staff.

 

Next Steps

To move from the general to the specific you need an action plan for your situation. Consider each of these:

  • Identify a responsible party for performance management – and it can’t be ‘everybody’ even though everyone and every team is responsible for their performance
  • Educate the staff at all levels regarding the intent of performance assessment and the reality of psychological, emotional, and cultural influences
  • Set a baseline for optimal performance – objective and realistic criteria that are agreed upon by those whose performance will be measured
  • Assess your current performance management process – get feedback from the staff, assess against industry benchmarks
  • Refine the process as needed
  • Be open to continuous improvement based on ongoing assessment of both performance management and individual and project performance.

[1] Lori Goler, Janelle Gale, Adam Grant, Let’s Not Kill Performance Evaluations Yet, Harvard Business Review https://hbr.org/2016/11/lets-not-kill-performance-evaluations-yet#:~:text=People%20want%20to%20know%20where,recognize%20and%20reward%20top%20performance.
[2] Ibid

7 Best Practices to Implement Resource Planning in the Audit and Accounting Industry

A Statista survey reveals that the estimated revenue of the accounting industry will grow to $145 billion.

The growth in the audit and accounting industry can be attributed to various factors, including increased demand for advisory services, the growing complexity of tax regulations, a rise in financial fraud, and ongoing technological advancements. As a result, there’s an increasing necessity for audit and accounting services as companies worldwide aim to safeguard their profit margins and retain a competitive edge.

Nevertheless, these firms encounter several workforce-related challenges, such as a scarcity of skilled consultants, suboptimal resource utilization, burnout, etc. Hence, it becomes crucial for the audit and accounting industry to adopt an efficient resource planning process to optimize their workforce and increase profitability.

 

This blog encompasses the key resource planning strategies for audit and accounting firms and how SAVIOM can help.

Let’s begin.

 

Benefits of resource planning in the audit & accounting industry

Resources are the backbone of audit and accounting firms as they generate revenue by billing their clients for the consultant’s time and expertise. Thus, these firms need effective resource planning to maximize the billable utilization of their employees and increase ROI.

Since this industry experiences seasonal fluctuations, resource planning enables firms to meet the capacity vs. demand gap and fulfill all the project requirements. This approach also bridges the skill gaps, ensuring consultants are available before project onset, thus reducing last-minute firefighting.

Further, it helps these firms identify and assign the right consultants to the right tasks at the right time and cost and deliver top-notch projects. In addition, it also enables firms to remain competitive in a swiftly evolving market and adapt to new challenges.

Now that you understand the importance of resource planning, let’s dive into the essential techniques to implement it.

Here are the seven best ways to create an efficient resource plan in audit and accounting firms:

 

1. Foresee and bridge demand gaps of auditors & accountants

One of the crucial steps of resource planning is where managers forecast the capacity vs. demand gap of consultants for pipeline audit/accounting projects. It will help them analyze the resource requirements ahead of time and take proactive measures to bridge the gaps. For instance, a pipeline project needs four auditors to complete the work successfully.

If the organization has two auditors, it indicates a shortage of two resources. To bridge this gap, managers can implement training programs for junior auditors, utilize out rotation and backfill strategy, or go for planned hiring. Conversely, if they had six auditors, managers could bring forward the project timelines or sell the extra capacity. This will help eliminate the last-minute hiring of resources.

 

2. Allocate competent accounting personnel to projects

The audit firms often utilize niche-skilled employees like forensic accountants, IT consultants, budget analysts, etc., to deliver projects. Since these resources are expensive to procure, managers must ensure they are judiciously allocated to projects based on their skills, availability, etc., to enhance their billable utilization.

Moreover, managers can assign skilled global accounting personnel from low-cost locations per the project requirements. For example, managers can allocate a skilled junior counterpart instead of assigning a senior auditor to audit financial reports. This will help minimize resourcing costs significantly and successfully deliver projects.

 

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3. Build the right mix of contingent and permanent consultants

In the audit and accounting industry, the demand for consultants witnesses a surge during the financial year-end. Therefore, it is imperative to have a blend of on-demand and permanent workforce to fulfill the project demands.

For instance, an audit firm requires a senior tax analyst to prepare and submit the tax filings for a short-term project. Since the existing resources are engaged with tasks, the firm can assign a contingent employee to complete the project on time. Conversely, they can deploy a permanent tax analyst for a long-term project. This will prevent last-minute firefighting for resources, and firms can effectively meet the deadlines.

 

4. Establish & monitor utilization targets of professionals

Most audit and accounting firms leverage internal and external professionals to meet client requirements. Therefore, establishing and monitoring the targets will ensure the blended workforce is utilized to the maximum potential. This will help them prevent operational inefficiencies and increase billable utilization.

For instance, on-demand auditors are hired hourly for short-term projects. Therefore, their billable utilization target can be set to 100%. Meanwhile, the target for permanent auditors can be set between 80-85% to balance their time spent on billable and non-billable tasks. This way, audit firms can optimize the productive utilization of their workforce and ensure seamless project execution.

5. Allow audit & accounting staff to choose projects of their interest

As the audit and accounting personnel spend most of their time working on similar projects, they experience monotony, which leads to disengagement and lowered productivity. To avoid this, managers must allow employees to choose projects of their interest by publishing open positions.

This will enable interested professionals to apply for suitable vacancies, and accordingly, managers can choose the best-fit consultants for the projects. When consultants work on assignments of their interest, it will increase their motivation and performance and improve their career trajectory.

 

6. Create training and development programs as appropriate

According to a survey, 80% of finance and accounting workers say it’s vital for a company to offer training programs to keep them upskilled for the future. 

Training and development programs are crucial in the audit and accounting industry as they help consultants build in-demand skills. For this, managers can formulate various upskilling programs, individual development plans (IDPs), etc.

Further, they can facilitate development initiatives like blended learning, shadowing opportunities, on-the-job training, etc. This will enable the professionals to take up multi-faceted projects, bridge existing skill gaps, and diversify their career portfolios.

 

7. Implement succession planning for critical roles

When consultants in critical positions retire or suddenly exit the firm, it can derail the projects, leading to client dissatisfaction. To avoid this situation, firms can implement succession planning.

For this, managers must regularly monitor professionals’ performance and determine who is eligible for the critical positions. Then, they must provide appropriate training to these resources so that they can take up strategic and leadership roles. This will enhance the consultants’ engagement and ensure project continuity.

Now that we know the steps, let’s understand how ERM software can help.

 

How does advanced ERM software help in effective resource planning?

Implementing Saviom’s ERM tool can enable audit and accounting firms to plan their consultants efficiently. The tool offers:

  • 360-degree visibility and advanced filters enable managers to identify and assign consultants based on their skills, competencies, location, etc.
  • Forecasting and capacity planning enable managers to foresee pipeline project demand and identify the shortage/excess of resources. Then, managers can take corrective measures like training, hiring, etc., to bridge the gaps.
  • BI reports like forecast vs. actual, and utilization helps implement remedial measures to eliminate under/over utilization. Besides, it helps mobilize accountants from non-billable to billable or strategic tasks.
  • What-if-analysis enables managers to create and compare various project scenarios and determine the best-fit resource plan.
  • With the open seat feature, managers can publish open positions, and professionals can choose projects of their interest, thus improving engagement.

 

Final thoughts

Resource planning is essential for audit and accounting firms to maximize workforce efficiency and improve project quality. By implementing the above strategies and a futuristic resource management solution, these firms can optimally utilize the professionals and maintain profitability.

Looking Back and Looking Forward to Improve

There are many New Year celebrations – Tet, Rosh Ha Shona, and more. Why not make every day the beginning of a new year?

But now we are here celebrating the Western solar new year. We are reminded to enjoy the moment, reflect on the past and visualize a healthier, happier, more productive, and peaceful future.

 

Time to Reflect and Plan

Now is a traditional time for looking back, remembering the past, and looking forward, resolving to make a “better” future. In project management this is quality improvement through assessment, control, improvement planning, and follow through.

As individuals, we make resolutions to improve by giving up bad habits and cultivating positive behavior. We resolve to stop overeating or drinking and to exercise more, or to take that course that will lead to a new career, or to be kinder and more understanding and patient.

But many resolutions last a short time because we don’t follow through.

On a team or organizational level, do you make resolutions and follow through with them? Do you reflect and plan as a normal ongoing process, or is it a once-a-year event?

 

Quality Management

Among project management’s principles is assuring quality by critically assessing performance and planning to improve. Dr Deming’s PDCA cycle: Plan, Do, Check, and Act is one way of looking at the improvement process.

Reflect and resolve once a year and you are certain to miss a lot of opportunities to improve performance and wellness. Build PDCA into your normal way of doing whatever you do and you will reap the benefits of an ever-improvising process.

 

Learn

This article reinforces the message of my October article, “Learn from the Past to Perfect Performance, “Learn from experience. Set aside time for reflection, learning, and making the intention to perfect the way you live and work.”

Improvement is cyclical. It is ongoing. It continues as long as the target process or product lasts. The target process may be your own project management process or a new process resulting from a project. Here the focus is on the project management process.

 

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PDCA

The PDCA cycle is an improvement model that uses a scientific method:

  • Plan – propose a change,
  • Do – implement it,
  • Check – measure to see if the intended goals are achieved,
  • Act – decide whether to adjust by taking appropriate action in another cycle, or to standardize and stabilize the new process.

You decide to standardize and stabilize changes to your process when you have achieved planned benefits. Then you start a new cycle based on your new standard.

 

The Standard

You may or may not have a standard to start with.

When a new process is being designed and implemented the standard is a set of expectations. For example, you expect to complete 90% percent of projects within 10% of the original planned time and budget.

If you have done performance measurement you may know that your current standard is 40% of your projects meeting that expectation. If you do not have an objective sense of your past performance, you are at a disadvantage, but all is not lost. Chances are there is a subjective sense that you are not satisfying stakeholder expectations. Too many projects are delivered late and overbudget.

Part of planning is to set an expectation, a standard or benchmark to use as a target. You determine your goals and set the standard for measuring or checking the effects of your efforts. Research to determine if your goals are realistic. Make sure you are setting a realistic expectation about how long it will take to achieve your goals. Assess risks.

 

Plan to Achieve Goals

With realistic goals in mind, you plan the way you will meet them. To do that well, you have a decision to make. Will you refine your existing process or start from a blank slate?

How unstable and undefined is the current process? Is documenting it worth the effort or is it more effective to find a good model and adapt it to your current conditions.

In the realm of project management, don’t try to invent a brand-new process. You would be reinventing the wheel. Instead, take the time and effort to find a suitable model or models for the kind of projects you perform. If you have multiple project types you may need multiple defined processes, some agile, some more structured.

 

Cause Analysis

Look back to see why you are not meeting stakeholder expectations. Sep back and candidly assess causes. Are schedules and budgets dictated from above or are they the result of actual planning based on expected resources and conditions? Are projects initiated without regard of their impact on ongoing operations and other projects? Are estimators and/or performers in need of training or better tools or both?

Looking back at causes and on the state of the current process often causes conflict and resistance. Performers and project managers may be attached to the way they have been operating.

For example, they may be happy not to have to follow a defined process. They may not have knowledge of or may be in denial regarding the perceptions of stakeholders. They may be threatened by criticism and resistant to change.

Tread carefully to manage change in a way that engages and motivates the people who will have to go through the transition and live with the new process.

 

Do

This is where follow through comes in. Educate, train, and implement change. Treat it as you would with any project, with care to support the people involved.

 

Check and Act

Realize that the new or changed process is not complete until you have checked to see if goals have been met. This is quality control and testing.

If you have done it well, the planning has left a standard, a benchmark, to measure against to determine if your efforts have achieved what you intended. Check often during the life of the improvement process.

Based on your findings decide and act. You may decide to continue, with or without changes to your goals, methods, or both. Or you may decide to stop, standardize, and stabilize the process.

Standardizing and stabilizing the process does not mean that your improvement work is done. You have just set a new standard against which to measure performance and go into a new PDCA cycle.

If you have done the improvement job well, future changes will be tweaks rather than major changes, though as new technologies like AI are introduced, more radical changes may be needed.

 

It is always a new year. Look back at what you have done, how successful it has been, and what you can do to make it better. Look forward to plan check and act.

 


Related articles:

Learn from the Past to Perfect Performance.
 https://www.projecttimes.com/articles/learn-from-the-past-to-perfect-performance/#:~:text=To%20optimize%20performance%2C%20learn%20from,intentions%2C%20performance%2C%20and%20goals
The Key to Performance Improvement: Candid Performance Assessment
https://www.projecttimes.com/articles/the-key-to-performance-improvement-candid-perfromance-assessment/
Achieving Quality Performance and Results
https://www.projecttimes.com/articles/achieving-quality-performance-and-results/

Narrowing the Talent Gap

How to be a front-runner in the race for talent

The talent crisis is real. Projects are at risk. It’s time to make talent a strategic priority.

 

As a result of economic growth and increasing projectization, the demand for project managers is expected to soar in the coming decade. At the same time, the collective impact of demographic trends, retirements, and cultural shifts in the workplace, will create a shrinking talent pool that is insufficient to meet demand. The Project Management Institute (PMI) and PwC’s latest global research indicates there is a lack of awareness, or perhaps some complacency, among project-based organizations of the risks that lie ahead, and the potential detrimental impact that the talent crisis will have on projects and their ability to meet strategic goals in the future.

Successful projects are a key driver of global economic growth. As more and more industries become projectized, the demand for skilled project managers is expected to soar in the coming decade. But at the same time, aging populations and declining birth rates in many countries are shrinking the size of their workforces. According to PMI’s 2021 Talent Gap: Ten-Year Employment Trends, Costs and Global Implications report, the global economy will need a total of 25 million new project professionals by 2030. To close this gap, 2.3 million people will need to enter project management-oriented employment (PMOE) every year just to keep up with demand.

 

The talent gap is being exacerbated by the post-pandemic ‘Great Resignation,’1 which has seen workers quitting their jobs in droves all over the world, and it seems that the situation will only get tougher. Microsoft’s Work Trend Index2 report estimates that over 40% of workers globally are considering quitting or changing professions in the coming year.

At the same time, PMI and PwC’s latest global research indicates that talent strategies haven’t changed much. There’s a widespread lack of focus on developing and retaining existing project managers, and a lack of variety and innovation in attracting and recruiting new talent. The core problem, we believe, is that there isn’t a business case for investment in talent—one that explicitly aligns capabilities to organizational strategy and competitive advantage. The business case should describe how hiring, training, performance, and retention strategies will be aligned to those capabilities; and critically, it should use a data-driven approach to assess capabilities, measure progress, and link that to organizational performance.

Without a systematic approach and a focus on hard numbers, personal traits and behaviors will continue to be viewed as “soft” and risk being undervalued. And unless capabilities-building is recognized and treated as the central enabler of successful strategy execution, organizations will be unable to meet their goals, projects will falter, and the profession as a whole will be unable to avoid the impact of a global talent crisis. Most organizations seem unaware of the crisis, however some, albeit a minority, have begun to take action.

 

 

The Talent Gap: Facts and Figures

Project management-oriented employment (PMOE)—which includes skilled project managers and those in less formal project management roles, that encompass project management skills—makes up 3% of all global employment, equating to 90 million jobs. This is expected to grow to 3.2% or 102 million jobs by 2030. By 2030, at least 13 million project managers are expected to have retired creating additional challenges for recruitment. To close the gap, 25 million new project professionals are needed by 2030.3

 

A Call to Action

The message is clear: talent, projects, and strategic goals are at risk unless organizations invest now in building winning capabilities to gain a competitive advantage.

  • Take it to the top: Make talent management a C-suite priority, with clear alignment of capabilities and strategic priorities.
  • Follow the numbers: Use a systematic, data-driven approach to assessing key capabilities, identifying gaps. and measuring progress.
  • Reinvent recruitment: Get smarter at attracting talent to plug capabilities gaps.
  • Elevate your L&D: Invest in fostering critical capabilities, using diverse learning methods.
  • Monitor, evaluate, and monitor again: Review and evolve talent strategies in line with feedback, progress, and the changing priorities of the business.

Click to learn more about what organizations can do to minimize the impact of the crisis.
Our research points to actions that make it easier to attract, develop and retain talent, as evidenced by the strategies taken by ‘high-performing’ organizations.

 

About Project Management Institute (PMI)

PMI is the world’s leading professional association for a growing community of millions of project professionals and changemakers worldwide. As the world’s leading authority on project management, PMI empowers people to make ideas a reality. Through global advocacy, networking, collaboration, research, and education, PMI prepares organizations and individuals to work smarter so they can drive success in a world of change. Building on a proud legacy dating to 1969, PMI is a “for-purpose” organization working in nearly every country around the world to advance careers, strengthen organizational success, and enable changemakers with new skills and ways of working to maximize their impact. PMI offerings include globally recognized standards, certifications, online courses, thought leadership, tools, digital publications, and communities.

Visit us at PMI.org, ProjectManagement.com, Facebook, X, and LinkedIn.

 


1 The term “Great Resignation” was coined by professor Anthony Klotz to describe the worldwide increase in people voluntarily leaving their jobs from April 2021 onward, supposedly as a result of the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic and workplace conditions.

2 Microsoft Work Trend Index. 2021. The Next Great Disruption is Hybrid Work—Are We Ready? Microsoft.

3 Project Management Institute. 2021. Talent Gap: Ten-Year Employment Trends, Costs, and Global Implications.

Strategies for Balancing Deadlines and Team Management in Q1

It’s common knowledge that less than half of the employees know the goals, strategies, and tactics the company has set for the year; this can result in a lack of team alignment, which will only cause further problems in meeting your goals.

Since Q4 has passed, now is the time to reorganize your strategies and give this new fiscal year of 2024 a strong start, beginning with planning your Q1.

So, let’s dive into tried and tested strategies that will ensure you have a smooth sailing first quarter and a successful year.

 

The Covey Time Management Matrix For Deadlines

Created by Steven Covey, this time management framework prioritizes your tasks and time for optimal productivity. In this modal, Covey emphasizes the need to use a four-quadrant approach that helps your business prioritize tasks, responsibilities, and deadlines based on their importance and urgency.

The Four Quadrants Explained

 

  • Quadrant 1 (Urgent and Important): Involves organizing critical tasks and responsibilities that need urgent attention to allocate the necessary time, effort, and resources. These tasks have impending deadlines, time-sensitive goals, or need alleviating immediate risk to the business.
  • Quadrant 2 (Not Urgent But Important): Involves creating plans and focusing on strategic tasks that will highly impact your business. You can identify and work on things that require additional planning and directly affect your overall goals.
  • Quadrant 3 (Urgent But Not Important): Involves minor yet urgent tasks requiring immediate assistance or attention. These tasks are usually the result of poor Q1 and Q2 planning, interrupted productivity, and distractions, so you don’t want too many of them to pile up.
  • Quadrant 4 (Not Urgent, Not Important): Involves tasks that are removable from your list of priorities to some extent, if not completely. They usually don’t take a lot of stressful work and are not directly related to your overall success or time.

 

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Team Management Tips To Ensure Success

1.    Set Realistic Deadlines

Before setting a deadline, you must gauge the complexity, resources, and scope of your tasks and the availability of team members with the necessary skills to accomplish them. You should also ensure your team explicitly understands the expectations and break down larger projects into smaller tasks to make them manageable. Use project management tools, calendars, or Gantt charts to visualize the milestones.

2.    Regular Communication

Feedback and internal communication between employees and employers help the team stay aligned with deadlines and goals. Establish regular feedback channels through meetings, chats, emails, etc., to ensure everyone is on the same page. Doing so will also allow you to resolve conflicts or issues, clarify doubts, and encourage collaboration more effectively.

3.    Encouraging Work Environment

Offer constant recognition and incentives to inspire your team to do better when a job is done well. Similarly, give the team upskilling opportunities to make them feel valued. Several online platforms offer professional development courses that teach various skills. For example, excel training with Acuity Training can help team members understand advanced features that will help them streamline their work.

4.    Be Mindful Of Your Employees

You must be flexible and adaptable with your team, especially when unexpected challenges or changes arise. Stay prepared to make readjustments and be empathetic to your employees’ circumstantial needs. To avoid major disruptions, have contingency plans, scenario analysis, and risk assessments in place.

 

To Summarize

Since the first quarter is crucial to unlock your company’s potential and set the pace for success, you must prioritize defining your objectives, using technology, encouraging collaboration, and monitoring progress. Remember that although Q1 can be challenging, it’s also the time for endless opportunities. To further enhance your team’s effectiveness in managing deadlines and fostering collaboration, consider implementing comprehensive project management training programs. These initiatives can empower your team with the skills needed to navigate the intricacies of Q1 projects efficiently, ensuring that they are well-equipped to handle tasks, meet deadlines, and contribute to the overall success of your business goals.